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Busted! Common Myths About Sunglasses

With summer in full swing, many will be or have been reaching for their favorite summer accessory – shades. However, there are a lot of misconceptions floating around about sunglasses. Of course, we know that you know better because you read our blog! So, this summer when you hear a naive sunglass-wearer utter a falsity about their sunglasses – you will know how to respond.

They say: “Darker Lenses offer more sun protection.”

You say: Wrong! Darker lenses offer the same UV protection as their lighter counterparts. Darker lenses can be more comfortable to wear, especially in bright light, since they significantly decrease the amount of light passing through the lens. This can work against you though if you do not make sure that you are buying sunglasses or lenses from a reputable dealer. Since your pupils are more dilated behind dark lenses, if your lenses do not have proper UV protection, harmful UV rays can flow right into your eyes.

 

They say: “Polarized lenses are better for your eyes than regular lenses.”

You say: Nah. If you don’t know what polarized lenses are, you can read up on them here. The short of it is that polarized lenses vastly improve comfort and clarity by blocking annoying glare and increasing contrast. While polarized lenses are definitely recommended due to this fact, they do actually offer the same amount of UV protection as their non-polarized counterparts.

 

They say: “Sun Damage to the eyes is temporary.”

You say: Not Always… Sometimes, some cases of eye sun damage can be temporary – like certain cases of snow blindness. However, most damage develops over time, over a lifetime of UV exposure, and becomes irreversible. Sun exposure contributes to macular degeneration, cataracts, and many other conditions.

 

They say: “I only need to wear sunglasses in summer when the sun is out.”

You say: Try again! Your eyes need protection year round. Yes, even on cloudy, rainy, blah days. Mornings and evenings have more reflected light that can make it straight into your eyes. Light bouncing off of snow is extra harmful. Wearing polarized lenses in the rain can actually help you see! Does that cover all of the excuses? You just have to check out your lenses’ Visual Light Transmission (or VLT) to make you’ll still be able to see out of your shades on those dark, gloomy days.

 

They say: “My child is fine without sunglasses.”

You say: Child abuse! (Just kidding please don’t say that). However, a very significant portion of UV damage can happen before a child is 18! Think about it – kids are outside SO much. Each time they go outside, the UV rays are working their way into their little eyeballs. You give your kid knee pads while he’s learning to ride a bike, why not throw some sunglasses on him too? A bonus is that the shatterproof polycarbonate lenses can help protect their face and eyes if their bike kicks up a few rocks along the way.

 

They say: “Sunglasses are sunglasses. Style or lens color doesn’t matter.”

You say: *Gasp* How dare you? Different styles and lens colors can have awesome benefits. For instance, wrap-style glasses are perfect for blocking sunlight at any angle while bike riding or playing sports. Different lens colors can then help up your game by increasing certain color contrasts. For instance, golfers often prefer amber-rose lenses, like our F30, and hunters look and perform sharp in yellow tinted lenses that can help enhance visibility in low-light conditions. By the way, Fuse has a ton of lens colors that you can test out and find out your favorite lens for all kinds of activities.

 

There you have it! A few common misconceptions about sunglasses, debunked. Now – when anyone starts muttering lies about UV protection, you’ll know what to say. Plus, we’re here to back you up whenever you need. Email us anytime at eyecontact@fuselenses.com

Posted by Jessica

Jessica is a caffeine dependent life form that can often be found helping with Fuse events, sending out emails, watching cat videos, giving away all of our stuff, or answering your questions on social media.

1 comment

David D. Allen

Thanks, great info. We appreciate your work!

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